RAD’s IVF Lab Features its Latest Embryo Research at ASRM 2015

23

OCTOBER, 2015

The IVF lab at Reproductive Associates of Delaware (RAD) was in Baltimore attending the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) Annual Meeting October 17-21 to feature their poster that highlights the latest embryo research at RAD.

The RAD Laboratory Staff at the 2015 ASRM Conference – (left to right) Linda Morrison, Director of Laboratory Services, Stacy Carney, Laboratory Manager, and Caitlin Boylan, Embryologist

The IVF lab at Reproductive Associates of Delaware (RAD) was in Baltimore attending the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) Annual Meeting October 17-21 to feature their poster that highlights the latest embryo research at RAD.
 

RAD’s poster, which was coauthored by Dr. Feinberg, Dr. Kovalevsky, Dr. Neithardt, and the laboratory team, focuses on the form and structure of day 5 and day 6 embryos, also known as blastocysts. After an IVF cycle but prior to embryo transfer, patients at RAD may decide to have their blastocysts undergo pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS), a comprehensive genetic screening tool. PGS detects whether a blastocyst has a normal complement of 46 chromosomes, which raises the likelihood of a successful pregnancy.
 

In their research, the RAD team set out to determine if the form and structure of blastocysts was related to an embryo having a normal complement of chromosomes. To test this hypothesis, they evaluated the embryos of 131 RAD patients under 37 years old. After the embryos were created, the laboratory team graded each embryo’s quality and sampled a few small cells from each embryo through a process called a trophectoderm biopsy. The cells were sent to an outside laboratory for PGS testing.
 

The results showed that a blastocyst’s form and structure was significantly associated with having a normal complement of 46 chromosomes. Blastocysts that received an “AA” grade, the highest ranking, had the greatest likelihood of having a normal set of chromosomes. Without PGS, RAD’s researchers noted that, when transferring the “AA” grade blastocysts, there was an 81.8% chance one of the embryos would have a normal complement of chromosomes.
 

“We are thrilled that ASRM selected our poster presentation to be featured at their Annual Meeting this year,” said Lab Director Linda Morrison. “PGS is an incredibly value tool in the armamentarium of reproductive techniques we have at RAD. This research shows not only the importance of PGS in our patient care, but also that the grading system used for embryo selection can be used as a decision-making tool for patients to decide whether PGS is right for them.”
 

At RAD, we believe performing PGS on every embryo to quickly identify blastocysts with a normal complement of chromosomes would help patients achieve pregnancy sooner. If other fertility centers performed a similar analysis of their day 5 and day 6 embryos using PGS, it could help them effectively counsel patients on the value of PGS and single embryo transfer.

Newark Office

4735 Ogletown-Stanton Road
M.A.P. 2, Suite #3217
Newark, DE 19713
Phone: (302) 602-8822
Fax: (302) 602-8832

 

Wilmington Office

Silverside Medical Center
2700 Silverside Road, Suite 2A
Wilmington, DE 19810
Phone: (302) 602-8822
Fax: (302) 602-8832

 

Dover Office

Eden Hill Medical Center
200 Banning Street, Suite 240
Dover, DE 19904
Phone: (302) 602-8822
Fax: (302) 602-8832

 

©Reproductive Associates of Delaware <> Site designed by CollageTeam.com